New York Times Buries All the Most Serious Allegations.

You can see which way the Times leans in this fawning article written about disgraced Archbishop Weakland, the man  who is now charging the Pope with stopping a defrocking trial. Of course the Pope did no such thing. The man was dying, so in his last days, the Vatican agreed to suspend the trial. He died four months later.

In reality, Weakland is only looking to shift blame from himself to the Vatican, and the New York Times goes along for the ride.

The article, which virtually whitewashes Bishop Weakland, is written by the same Laurie Goodstein who wrote the horribly misleading article about the Pope.

So: Weakland, while being one of the most notorious bishops in the country, is treated with kid gloves.

The Pope, who is generally recognized as doing the most to get rid of child abusers in the church, has facts twisted, facts taken completely out of context.

You figure it out.

I dunno, man, the Times kinda appears to be on the side of the abusers.

Item one.

Two.

After 25 years as the leader of Milwaukee’s Catholic Community, Weakland retired six years ago amid a sex scandal of his own. In a deposition videotaped in June, Weakland explained that when reassigning a priest he suspected of abuse he didn’t notify the parishes where the offenders were being sent, in part because he knew they wouldn’t have taken him. 

“No parish would’ve accepted a priest unless you could say that he has gone through the kind of psychological examination and that he’s not a risk to the parish,” Weakland said. After 25 years as the leader of Milwaukee’s Catholic Community, Weakland retired six years ago amid a sex scandal of his own. In a deposition videotaped in June, Weakland explained that when reassigning a priest he suspected of abuse he didn’t notify the parishes where the offenders were being sent, in part because he knew they wouldn’t have taken him.

 

“No parish would’ve accepted a priest unless you could say that he has gone through the kind of psychological examination and that he’s not a risk to the parish,” Weakland said.

Three.

He admits to having affairs with several men during his tenure in Milwaukee (he cites “loneliness” as a reason) and criticizes Pope John Paul II, of course.

Four.

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