All The News That’s Fit To Print, Or That We Can Make Up.

You can see the credibility problem the New York Times has. Basically, you can’t trust anything they print, because it is likely to be withdrawn in a day or two:

Here is the excerpt from the original article:

Jeffrey Lena, a lawyer for the Holy See, said the case was “really without merit.” He added, “When you’re claiming intentional infliction of emotional distress because you got no response to a letter to a private individual who is like a prime minister, that is going off the deep end.”

Notice where the quotation marks are. Clearly, a professional reporter would not have included anything in the quote that was not said.

Would they?

But then this appeared:

Correction: April 23, 2010 

An article on Friday about a lawsuit against Pope Benedict XVI regarding a sexual abuse case quoted incorrectly from a comment by Jeffrey Lena, a lawyer for the Holy See. Mr. Lena said, “When you’re claiming intentional infliction of emotional distress because you got no response to a letter from a private individual to a prime minister, that is going off the deep end.” He did not say that the letter was “to a private individual who is like a prime minister.”

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